Euphorbia neohumbertii


Scientific Name

Euphorbia neohumbertii Boiteau

Synonyms

Euphorbia neohumbertii var. neohumbertii

Scientific Classification

Family: Euphorbiaceae
Subfamily: Euphorbioideae
Tribe: Euphorbieae
Subtribe: Euphorbiinae
Genus: Euphorbia

Description

Euphorbia neohumbertii is a succulent plant, up to 3 feet (90 cm) tall, with erect, 4-sided stems and large, green leaves that grow on the top of the stems. In the winter, when leaves drop, a very prominent scar is left on the stems. In the spring, the stem is topped with scarlet flowers tipped in yellow.

Hardiness

USDA hardiness zones 9b to 11b: from 25 °F (−3.9 °C) to 50 °F (+10 °C).

How to Grow and Care

Euphorbias are very easy to care for. These plants require a little pampering to become established, but once they are, they are self-sufficient. More die from too much care and watering than from neglect. Euphorbias need well-draining soil and lots of sunlight. They are not particular about soil pH, but they cannot tolerate wet soil. Unlike most succulents, Euphorbia does not handle long periods of drought well. It may need weekly watering during the summer. Water whenever the soil is dry several inches below the surface. Water deeply, but don't let them sit in wet soil, which can cause root rot. Add some organic matter or fertilizer to the planting hole. If you are growing them in containers or your soil is poor, feed with a half-strength fertilizer monthly.

These succulents can be grown from seed, but they can be difficult to germinate (or even find). They are usually propagated by cuttings. This can be tricky because of the exuding sap. Rooting hormone is recommended with Euphorbias. They tend to grow problem-free, but there are a few pests and diseases to be alert for. See more at How to Grow and Care for Euphorbia.

Origin

Euphorbia neohumbertii is native to Madagascar.

Links

  • Back to genus Euphorbia
  • Succulentopedia: Browse succulents by Scientific Name, Common Name, Genus, Family, USDA Hardiness Zone, Origin, or cacti by Genus

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Euphorbia neohumbertii – Succulent plants

Euphorbia neohumbertii is an ornamental, erect, succulent plant that grows up to 90 cm (3 feet) tall, with 4-sided stem and large, green leaves. The leaves grow on the top of the stem and when they drop a very prominent scar is left on the stem. It loses the leaves in the winter. In the spring, the stem is topped with scarlet flowers tipped in yellow.

Scientific Classification:

Family: Euphorbiaceae
Subfamily: Euphorbioideae
Tribe: Euphorbieae
Subtribe: Euphorbiinae
Genus: Euphorbia

Scientific Name: Euphorbia neohumbertii Boiteau
Synonyms: Euphorbia neohumbertii var. neohumbertii

How to grow and maintain Euphorbia neohumbertii :

Light:
It prefers full to partial sunlight. Provides good sunlight at least 3-5 hours of the day, and turn it regularly so that your plant doesn’t begin to grow lopsided.

Soil:
It grows well in well-draining, gritty soil or cactus potting mix. They are not particular about soil pH, but they cannot tolerate wet soil.

Water:
You can allow the soil to dry out between each watering. Before watering the plant check underneath the pot through the drainage holes to see if the roots are dry. If so then add some water. Do not water too often to prevent overwatering, that can potentially kill it off.

Temperature:
It prefers an optimal temperatures of 60 degrees Fahrenheit – 85 degrees Fahrenheit / 16 degrees Celsius to 29 degrees Celsius.

Fertilizer:
Fertilize every two weeks with a diluted balanced liquid fertilizer during its growing season in the spring and summer. Avoid fertilizing your plant during the fall and winter months.

Propagation:
It can be easily propagated by cuttings. Take cutting in spring, which needs to be dried out for a couple of weeks in shade before potting. This can be tricky, because of the exuding sap. Rooting hormone is recommended with Euphorbias. Also can be propagated from seed, but they can be difficult to germinate.

Pests and Diseases:
Euphorbia may be susceptible to mealy bugs, scale insects, occasionally spider mites.


Euphorbia Species

Category:

Water Requirements:

Drought-tolerant suitable for xeriscaping

Sun Exposure:

Foliage:

Foliage Color:

Height:

Spacing:

Hardiness:

USDA Zone 9b: to -3.8 °C (25 °F)

USDA Zone 10a: to -1.1 °C (30 °F)

USDA Zone 10b: to 1.7 °C (35 °F)

USDA Zone 11: above 4.5 °C (40 °F)

Where to Grow:

Danger:

All parts of plant are poisonous if ingested

Handling plant may cause skin irritation or allergic reaction

Bloom Color:

Bloom Characteristics:

Bloom Size:

Bloom Time:

Other details:

Soil pH requirements:

Patent Information:

Propagation Methods:

Seed Collecting:

Regional

This plant is said to grow outdoors in the following regions:

Vista, California(9 reports)

Gardeners' Notes:

On Nov 12, 2007, dirtyhandsfl from Clearwater, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:

I think this is the one in my yard. Self sows, hasn't bloomed yet, so don't know the color. So many look alike it is hard to tell. Drought tolerant and semi shade. (maybe why it never bloomed) No insect damage to speak of. A hardy plant, didn't find it to be decidious though. 2 years old.

On Jun 18, 2004, palmbob from Acton, CA (Zone 8b) wrote:

When I got this exotic plant from Madagascar everyone said it was a greenhouse plant- will rot to the ground the second winter comes. well, I don't have a greenhouse that would be OK for succulents, so I just planted it as an 'annual' and waited.. 5 years later it's still doing OK. I think zone 9b is pretty marginal, but I bet zone 10a would be great for it. Took many minor frosts with minimal damage (haven't had a severe frost since planting, though). Flowers every year these hot red-orange flowers and large leaves come out in summer- shade cloth would probably be better for it as the leaves always look stressed in hot sun. Is a square-sided collumnar plant with bristly safe spines up the sides topped with huge, lancelote dark green leaves in summer. Saw these for sale all over Tha. read more iland- very popular there.. obviously take a lot of water OK as long as it's warm.


Watch the video: Overwintering Vlog 7 - Big Euphorbia Succulent Plants


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